Real Time Reading

Shadow of Night Real-Time Reading – April 9-10 – Chapter 31

Photo by Martin Krchnacek on Unsplash

“You don’t think we’re being too philosophical?” I wondered aloud, worrying at my lip with my fingers.

“This is the court of Rudolf II,” Hoefnagel said drily. “There is no such thing as too philosophical.”

The Rudolf II of the All Souls Trilogy is complicated — a villainous, lecherous man who just happens to patronize and support some of the greatest artists of his time. The Met Museum has several of the items from Rudolf’s Kunstkammer on display to include the images featured here: the celestial globe by Gerhard Emmoser, a female nude in the style of Albrect Durer, a bronze Apollo by Adriaen de Vries, and this allegorical relief by Hans Daucher:

As this essay notes, the bulk of Rudolf’s collection was dispersed after his death — however, you can see many of the items that once belonged to his court at the Kunstkammer Museum in Vienna. Several of these items are on virtual display, including this ball runner clock by Christoph Margraf and this mechanical celestial globe by Johannes Reinhold the Elder and Georg Roll. The curator’s notes also reveal fascinating details about life in Rudolf’s court… like how he had Roll locked up in prison when the globe he delivered didn’t work as promised. Charming. True to Shadow of Night, the curator’s notes also reveal that Rudolf had, err, “a penchant for erotic-mythological subject matters” such as this extremely disturbing painting of Leda and the Swan by Joseph Heintz the Elder. I cannot unsee this.

Signor Pasetti was delighted to teach some of the court ladies a “dance of the wandering stars,” which would provide Matthew something heavenly to observe while he waited for his beloved moon to appear.

Blame quarantine, y’all, but I definitely fell down a Renaissance dance YouTube hole. Our friend Signor Pasetti did, in fact, exist (and he was the imperial dancing master for Rudolf II), but I couldn’t find any preserved examples of his choreography. What I did find was examples of the hopping dance known as the galliard and the stately pavane. Embedded below is a video that purports to demonstrate Czech folk and court dances of the Renaissance. I have no idea, as I was not there, but I’ll buy it for purposes of imagining the dance of the wandering stars.

You can learn more about Renaissance dance types (and watch helpful videos) via the U.S. Library of Congress.

“It is a mark of respect, Herr Roydon.” Rudolf placed a subtle emphasis on the name, “This once belonged to King Vladislaus and was passed on to my grandmother. The insignia belongs to a brave company of Hungarian knights known as the Order of the Defeated Dragon.”

Rudolf may be referring to the Order of the Dragon, or the Societas Draconistarum, a monarchical chivalric order founded by Sigismund von Luxembourg that sought to fight the Ottoman Empire, defend the Hungarian monarchy, and defend the Catholic Church. The order chose as its symbol the defeated dragon slain by St. George, sometimes depicted as a ouroboros with a red cross. Vlad II Dracul, Prince of Wallachia (and father of Dracula!), was a member of the order. According to Wikipedia, there aren’t many surviving historical examples of the original emblem… which is probably why my internet searches turned up a lot of very modern jewelry portraying dragons and no beautifully-embellished, jewel-encrusted chains like the one Rudolf gives Diana in 1591. I like to imagine that she left it behind and 16th Century Matthew lost it.

I tried extremely hard to find an image of the phallic cabbage root Diana mentions from the Kunstkammer, but alas — the internet failed me. In our next installment for the Real-Time Reading, we’re fleeing Prague under cover of night. I hope you packed your red hose.

Between now and then, you can find our back catalogue of episodes here or you can get in touch with us by e-mailing us, following us on Twitter, or by becoming a member of our Facebook group. As a reminder, we’re starting our chapter-by-chapter discussion of TIME’S CONVERT beginning THIS SUNDAY, 12 April 2020. We can’t wait to see what you have to say!

Until next time,

xoxo

Cait and Jen

Podcast

Episode 71 – The Narrative Ish

Photo by Farzad Mohsenvand on Unsplash

Happy Sunday, loves.

We promise — the plot and time travel discussion is coming — we’re just chickens. Procrastinating chickens. This week, we’re talking about all the themes covered by the All Souls Trilogy — identity, family, love and trauma, redemption, the meaning of the epigraph, and on and on. While wrapping our brains around these huge topics, we’re also talking about redeeming antagonists, the price of responsibility, divinity, cosmic duologies, and even a little tiny bit of time travel. It’s a big, meaty episode, so dig in and let us know what you think by shooting us a message on Twitter, sending us an e-mail, or by joining our discussion group, the Chamomile & Clove Clovers on Facebook.

Download the episode here.





If you haven’t already, please leave us a rating or review on the podcast application of your choice! You can also support us via Patreon or by purchasing some C&C swag on Redbubble.

Keep your eyes peeled for our Time’s Convert reading schedule on Twitter and Facebook. Also, MARK YOUR CALENDARS for All Souls Con this October in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Next time, we PLOT.

xoxox

Cait and Jen

Podcast

Episode 69 – Segway Away

Happy Sunday, Dear Clovers!

This is our last discussion of The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness. It is not, however, our last foray into the world of All Souls. In addition to our planned All Souls Trilogy wrap episodes, we will be continuing to discuss A Discovery of Witches the TV series, and will be venturing into a discussion of Time’s Convert by Deborah Harkness. The point is, you’re not rid of us yet.

In this episode, we discuss themes, motifs, book favorites, and listener feedback for The Book of Life. Catch us next time for the first of our trilogy wrap episodes. We can’t wait!

Download the episode.

You can reach us via e-mail at chamomileandclovecast@gmail.com, on Twitter @chamomilenclove, or on Facebook. You’re also welcome to rate us on Podchaser, support us on Patreon, or check out our pod merchandise on Redbubble.

You can also find us taking part in the ADOW TV Rewatch Party Giveaway. We’ve put up some exclusive C&C swag, so check out Deb’s website for the giveaway details, and enter to win here.

Until next time,

xoxo

Jen and Cait

Podcast

Episode 67 – Sol in Denouement

More than that, the ouroboros symbolized our partnership. Matthew and I were an alchemical marriage of vampire and witch, death and life, sun and moon. That combination of opposites created something finer and more precious than either of us could ever have been separately.

We were the tenth knot.

Unbreakable.

Without beginning or end.

Deborah harkness, the book of life

Clovers.

We can’t believe that the day has finally come, but it’s time to close the last cover on Deb Harkness’s The Book of Life and close out our chapter discussion of the All Souls Trilogy. Hours and hours of planning and note-taking, laughing, crying, recording, and editing has come to an end. In this episode, we’re talking about Chapters 40 and 41 of the Book of Life, including the narrative conceit of blood rage, Diana’s character arc, and an unexpected (and apparently VERBOTEN) reference to Grease 2.

Download the episode here.

We managed to get through it without getting super emotional, but this feels momentous. As we close out the trilogy (and 2019), we want to make sure you know how blessed we are to be a part of this fandom and to have shared this incredibly detailed and magically expansive world with you. Thank you for your comments and e-mails, your tweets and hugs, your thought-provoking and inspiring engagement with this text. What an honor it’s been to go on this journey with you.

There’s still time to e-mail us your questions and comments for both our Book of Life and trilogy wrap discussions, so please drop us a line at chamomileandclovecast@gmail.com if you’ve got something to say about this book or ANYTHING ELSE.

If you’d like, you can also follow us on Twitter @chamomilenclove or join our Facebook group, the Chamomile & Clove Clovers. You can also support us by visiting our Redbubble store, our Patreon page, or simply by leaving a rating and review on Facebook, Podchaser, or the podcast app of your choice.

Thank you for making this so much fun. We love you.

With love, from cover to cover,

Cait and Jen

Podcast

Episode 66 – The Comeuppance Triptych

Photo by Pawel Franke on Unsplash

Happy Sunday, dearest Clovers!

It’s a momentous day. Somehow, on Matthew and Diana’s wedding anniversary (four hundred and something years later), we made our way to the climax of the Book of Life. In Chapters 37-39, we’re talking about rescuing Matthew, James Bond, Peak Diana, moral authority, and the difference between justice and vengeance. It’s a fitting end to a momentous, exciting story and we’re so glad you’re a part of it.

Download the episode here.

If you have THOUGHTS, IDEAS, QUESTIONS, CONCERNS, or POLL IDEAS for our book and trilogy wrap episodes, now is the time! Get in touch via Twitter @chamomilenclove, by e-mail at chamomileandclovecast@gmail.com, or through our Facebook page.

If you like what we do, consider supporting us by leaving a review on iTunes, buying some merch on Redbubble , or by becoming a patron.

We’ll catch you next time for our VERY LAST chapter discussion for the All Souls Trilogy!

Xoxoxo,

Cait and Jen